Sometimes you have to be bad to become great

If Ronaldo was to pass more to his teammates while in the box, his goal tally will eventually drop, he’ll become one of those many players who score between 10-20 goals a season. You know them, the mediocre players.

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Through out the ages, society has coined terms to address people it deems “bad”, terms like selfish, greedy, envious among others.

And in most cases we end up spending our lives trying to avoid being called any of these terms that our lives never get to rise beyond mediocre. 

Cristiano Ronaldo, one of the greatest footballers has often been called selfish for not passing the ball to others when he has sight of goal. But it’s b’se of this “selfishness” that he scores more goals than his teammates, becomes top scorer and eventually wins the Ballon D’or.

If you choose to be unselfish then society will still coin a term for you. Let’s take an example of a woman, a woman who is “unselfish” towards men’s advances will be branded a b**ch by the same society that condemns being “selfish”. Which prompts a question, how can one be unselfish without being something bad?

Well, the answer to this question does exist but society will never say it out loud. The answer is ” mediocrity”.

Back to Ronaldo. If Ronaldo was to pass more to his teammates while in the box, his goal tally will eventually drop, he’ll become one of those many players who score between 10-20 goals a season. You know them, the mediocre players.

This poses another question, in your life as a doctor, teacher, businessman, nurse or any other job, do you want to be Cristiano Ronaldo or Olivier Giroud?.

If your answer is the former, then you should stop minding about how society will brand you b’se that’s what’s keeping you in that mediocre job, that mediocre life, that mediocre income.

In the series “Spartacus: War of the Damned”, Marcus Licinius Crassus (Played by Simon Merrells) was the richest man in Rome. At one point he was criticised by a Roman General who branded him “greedy” for his desire to conquer more places despite being the richest man in Rome.

It is Crassus’s response that sent the General into silence. He said:

“Greed is but a word jealous men inflict upon the ambitious.”

To you my reader, never desist from pursuing your ambitions, b’se most of your critics especially those in society are just jealous of you and your ambitions.

The corrupt are murderers

Many Ugandans die every year but none of these deaths ever get traced back to their root cause, CORRUPTION.

To the corrupt, very few ever think about the outcome of their actions. Outcomes such as loss of lives, property and livelihoods. To them, taking money through corruption simply means a new car, a new house among other luxuries.

But for the people that money was meant for, it would have been their only hope of survival and its disappearance is fast ticket to the grave.

Most corrupt people may claim innocence about the people that die due to their actions, but this doesn’t simply mean they are innocent. Lawyers have a term for this kind of murder, they call it “involuntary manslaughter”.

For every man, woman & child who dies of malaria because some one in the ministry of health has embezzled money for mosquito nets and medicine is equal to involuntary manslaughter.

Every construction worker who gets crushed by a building because the engineers have embezzled the money is an act of murder.

Many soldiers die because someone high up in the chain of command is embezzling funds meant to purchase logistics for front line troops.

Women and babies are lost daily in labour wards because someone embezzled the money for medical supplies and equipment. Tell me how this isn’t murder.

Most road accidents occur as a result of poor roads, but someone in Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) stole the money to construct a safer four-lane road.

It is for this reason that I stress the fact that, The Corrupt are murderers. Adam’s blog condemns all corrupt activities. Thanks for reading. Have a fantastic week.

TAX INCREASE ON CHOCOLATES AND CONFECTIONERIES A FIGHT AGAINST OBESITY AND DIABETES

A survey conducted in 2011 showed that 4.2% of women aged 15-49 were obese while 0.6% of Ugandan men in the same age bracket were obese

Uganda’s 2016/17 national budget announced an increase in taxes imposed on chocolates and confectioneries. The 26.3 trillion budget which was read to the public last week, will generate 70 percent of its income from local taxes. This revelation may not put a smile on the country’s taxpayers, but could be a vital step in reducing obesity and diabetes in Uganda. That’s b’se chocolates and confectioneries are to become a little bit more expensive.

Candy bars, cakes, Swiss rolls, chocolates are replacing natural foods in the diets of most Ugandans. Employees have to grab quick meals in short lunch breaks while others opt to have their lunch on the job, for students, the 30 minutes of break time mean a trip to the canteen where a great deal of edibles sold are confectioneries.

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Confectioneries on sale

According to the World Obesity Federation, a survey conducted in 2011 showed that 4.2% of women aged 15-49 were obese while 0.6% of Ugandan men in the same age bracket were obese. A series of research studies have established a direct link between excessive consumption of chocolates and confectioneries to diabetes and obesity.

Consuming chocolates and confectioneries for three months of a school term or a week on the job surely qualifies as “excessive”. With the Uganda government dedicated to fighting obesity and diabetes, the tax increase may be key in this fight.

The producers of chocolates and confectioneries may not take on these taxes themselves but instead pass them onto the consumers by increasing the prices of the product. Hopefully it’s this price increase that will discourage many from consuming chocolates and confectioneries, and will be a vital step toward the reduction of diabetes and obesity in Uganda.

Out Now!! ARTHUR documentary brings new life to Ugandan documentary story telling.

The Documentary follows the “…..story of a creative artist who uses art to uplift the lives of children living in Katanga, the largest slum in Uganda.”

The Documentary follows the “…..story of a creative artist who uses art to uplift the lives of children living in Katanga, the largest slum in Uganda.”

Directed by Ndawula Jordan Braise, Produced by Edmond Tamale and Ndawula Jodan Braise, ARTHUR  sets itself apart from the common format of documentaries in Uganda.

Providing various angles to the story as well as innovative camera work and superb narrations. The effort for making ARTHUR was a tandem of Mufasa Pictures and EDCOM FILMZ.

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Scene from the documentary

The main subject of the documentary, Arthur Conrad Kisitu posseses a host of talents he has used through out the years to influence hundreds, perhaps thousands of people around him and among these are the children living in Katanga.

The documentary  adresses all these people with the centre of it all being the children, mostlty orphans in Katanga.

Running time: 25 minutes
Director: Ndawula Jodan Braise
Producers: Edmond Tamale, Ndawula Jodan Braise
Writers: Ndawula Jodan Braise and Tamale Edmond
Co-Producer: Kirabo Joyce

Pros
-Great picture quality (HD 1080p)
– High quality sound and narrations
– Good Lighting
– Great coverage
– Well synched subtitles

Cons
– The 25 mins of time

ARE WE FIGHTING THE WRONG ENEMY? Malaria kills more Ugandans than Al-Shabaab, ADF & LRA combined

We buy insanely expensive Jet fighters and choppers while some of our citizens can’t afford basic medical care.

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Malaria kills thousands of Ugandans every year, most of which are children and pregnant women, but we allocate more resources and funds toward the security sector while our real enemy lies far from the security of the country.

In 2013, The New Vision reported that the annual death toll due to malaria had hit the 100,000 mark. (http:// www.newvision.co.ug/new_vision/news/1319285/100-ugandans-die-malaria-minister)

We spend over 1.5 trillion on security, a large portion of our security forces carry guns that cost more than their monthly salary. We spend that much while thousands continue to die of malaria.

Malaria isn’t just a disease, it could mean the difference between a good & ugly economy. Some tourists choose not to come to Uganda for fear of the disease. Doctors, teachers, civil servants, taxpayers and other contributors to the economy all get affected by malaria.

With many children dying of malaria, the age gap will grow leaving many old employees in the economy. I can’t seem to find words stressing the importance of young people in the economy.

We buy insanely expensive Jet fighters and choppers while some of our citizens can’t afford basic medical care.

Until the day we to come realise that we are fighting the wrong enemy, thousands will continue to die

By
Walusimbi Adam

Dear Reader,

Every relationship starts somewhere, not with the fancy cars and mansions but with a simple “hi, nice to meet you”.

And today I say my “Hi” to you Dear Reader, welcome to Adam’s Blog.

It’s because of you that I got the motivation to start up this platform and it is with you that I hope to share many great written moments.

As the writer, I get to share ownership of this blog with you, otherwise there would be no blog absent you, Reader.

The blog will include the writer’s opinions about events in various fields like politics, sports, society, entertainment etc, well researched articles, multimedia and links to other sites.

It is with you beloved Reader that I wish to embark on what is destined to be one hell of a ride.

Yours Truly, Walusimbi Adam